Category: Writing

My 300 Year Old Friend – part 2

This will be my last Black History Month related post for 2019 but I can’t promise I won’t revisit my friend Jupiter Hammon.


I took advantage of a long plane ride this week to continue researching my friend Jupiter Hammon.  Cedrick May edited The Collected Works of Jupiter Hammon, published in 2017.  This is my second time reading this collection and it will not be the last.

The new insights into the life of Jupiter Hammon from Cedrick May are very different from in previous biographies published on Hammon.  While it is a joy to read the written, published works of this important African-American poet it is equally important reading the notes and comments from Mr. May.  His interpretation of Hammon’s writings in parallel with the historical happenings of the time help to center Jupiter to his surroundings.

Researching a person of color, and African-American slave born in 1711 is not the easiest thing to do, but is sure is fun. There are no paintings or illustrations of his image.  The camera had not been invented yet at Jupiter’s birth, or by the time of his death, estimated around 1806.  The fact the there is so much material documented for Jupiter is astounding and most likely related to the fact that his owners were successful businessmen and in the habit of maintaining copious documentation.

I can’t explain my almost obsession to Jupiter but I’m all in now.  I’ll be scheduling more time at the Lloyd Harbor Historical Society and other historical resources as I continue my research.

 

 

My 300-year-old friend

Today’s post is about my 300-year-old friend, Jupiter Hammon.  There are no known photos of Jupiter but I’m enjoying learning about his life on Long Island.  This was definitely not in any history book in high school.  Ironic too, because he lived only a few miles from my high school.

Jupiter was born into slavery on October 17, 1711, in the manor house of Henry Lloyd in Lloyd’s Neck on Long Island. A slave of the Lloyd family, Jupiter read and studied the bible and was also the first African American published in the United States.  Jupiter became known as a preacher to the slaves on Lloyd Manor and in surrounding communities. He was a gentle person and he taught the gospel of the bible and encouraged slaves to be dutiful yet learn the true teachings of Christianity.

He will bring us all, rich and poor, white and black, to his judgment seat.                              – Jupiter Hammon

Let all the time you can get be spent in trying to learn to read.                                                    – Jupiter Hammon

 

Miss Phillis Wheatley supports General George Washington

Today’s subject is Miss Phillis Wheatley.  Taken from her home in Africa and sold as a slave aboard a ship named Phillis, she was sold to John Wheatley as a servant for his wife. Her intelligence was evident and she was educated by the Wheatley family that owned her.

That education was unheard of for a woman, let alone an African slave. Phillis is credited with being the first African American published in Europe in 1773.  Phillis-Wheatley-book-bw1.jpg

 

 

 

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In a communication to General George Washington, she wrote, “Proceed, great chief, with virtue on thy side. Thy every action let the goddess guide.”

While slaves of the time were being offered freedom by the British in exchange for loyalty to the British crown, Miss Wheatley displayed her support for the Continental Army.  Her support earned her an invitation from General Washington to visit General Washington at his headquarters in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Her patriotic writings, in later times, were not held with the same enthusiasm.  Phillis Wheatley died in her early 30s in Boston, Massachusetts, on December 5, 1784.

 

African American History on Long Island

This post is about family history crossing into American history.  Both histories get lost and forgotten over time.  I’m certainly more aware of how my history drives my present and my future.

Today I’m posting a snippet from the archives of the Suffolk County Historical Society on Long Island, NY.  I stumbled on this a short while ago when researching my husband’s “Smith” ancestry on Long Island.  The small world factor was overwhelming to me when I learned of the connection between Henry Highland Garnet, abolitionist, activist and minister, and a distant ancestor of my husband, Epenetus Smith.  It was that first name, Epenetus, that jumped off the page at me.

Henry Highland Garnet

Henry and his family escaped slavery lived in New York City.  There Henry was educated at the African Free School.   After some time there, slave catchers attempted to capture the family.  Henry ended up with Quaker abolitionists who sent him to Long Island to escape. Henry ended up in Smithtown as an indentured servant of Epenetus Smith.  Henry worked in the tavern and was tutored by Samuel Smith.  The two remained friends for the remained of their lives.

Once the slave catchers had given up, Henry was able to continue his education and grow into a remarkable African American. – PJN

From The Suffolk County Historical Society Library Archives:

“Although one of the most well-known African Americans of the nineteenth century, Henry Highland Garnet, sadly, is little remembered today. Even less remembered are his connections to Long Island and Suffolk County. As a young fugitive slave and an outspoken abolitionist, Garnet was given shelter by sympathizers on Long Island for several years. Quakers in Westbury took him in, and later they arranged for him to go farther east and be apprenticed to Epenetus Smith of Smithtown.

Despite his birth into the bondage of slavery, the loss of a limb, and the persistent discrimination and bigotry he faced, Garnet went on to achieve great successes: he was an effective orator and writer, prominent clergyman, educator, and diplomat. He was also one of the first African Americans to be appointed as a U.S. ambassador.

Henry Highland Garnet has the notable distinction of being the first African American to speak at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC. On Sunday, February 12, 1865, within days of Congress’s adoption of the 13th Amendment banning slavery, Rev. Garnet delivered a sermon in the Hall of the House of Representatives.”

 

After Groundhog Day

Black history month kicked off February 1st.  This year I’m using the month to seek out the history of African Americans unknown to me.  I’ve been researching African Americans in the 1700s and I can tell you there is quite a lot to learn.  I’ll share a story, photo, quote, or other interesting tidbits.

First up is Science fiction writer Octavia Estelle Butler was the author of a dozen novels and many short stories. She also remains the only science fiction writer to ever receive a MacArthur Foundation ‘Genius’ Grant.

Quote from Ms. Butler:

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Octavia E. Butler 1947-2006

“And I have this little litany of things they can do. And the first one, of course, is to write – every day, no excuses. It’s so easy to make excuses. Even professional writers have days when they’d rather clean the toilet than do the writing.”

I was tickled when I read this quote. I can’t tell you how clean my bathrooms are when I’m trying to get a story on paper.  I’m getting a bit more consistent with daily writing time.  I’ve varied what I’m working on so that makes me more excited to stare at the blank page.  At least it’s a different blank page for a different project.  Sounds like an excuse, but its been working for me so far.

Catching up – again.

It’s been cold and rainy this Saturday and aside from an appointment with my chiropractor and nutritionist, I’ve been inside all day.  Oh yeah, I also made my way to the mall to exchange a couple of things.  Luckily, I didn’t get very wet and the mall trip was non-eventful.  That is a wonderful thing for me since I try to avoid malls these days. That doesn’t mean that I don’t like to shop – I do!  I just miss the old downtown, village shopping that I grew up with.  The village still exists of course and it is a pleasure to visit if you can find a parking space and if you can manage the crowded sidewalk.  I suppose many towns have evolved like that across the country, it’s just growth, and progress.  Especially on Long Island.

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On New Year’s Day, my husband and I took a ride out to Greenport, Long Island. I wanted to see if I could find one of the last independent bookstores on the east end. Burton’s Bookstore. They were, of course, closed for the holiday but the weather was perfect for a ride out to explore. Windy for walking, but still nice. As I took a peek through the window I could smell the books.  Now you know where I’ll be going next weekend!

I will spend the rest of today working on a new manuscript. I’ll probably also get to a revision for another as I keep on track to getting more manuscripts submission ready. Cold and rainy days are made for authors, in my opinion.  No outside distractions to remove me from my chair.

So, until the blank screen or notebook become less appealing than laundry,  and cleaning the bathroom.  I’ll be in my chair until further notice.

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Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

Life after Rocky

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Rocky

It’s been twenty days since our beloved Rocky went to heaven. Christmas seemed like a blur this year between his care, my grief, and family holiday expectations. Normally, I love spending time with family during the holidays but this year it was tough to keep my grief and depression from taking over. Thanks to an email from a neighbor that reminded me of Rocky’s good life with us. That helped me regain my focus. I started writing again two days ago and was able to get a picture book draft on paper that had been bouncing around in my head. 

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I sat down this morning to reorganize my writing. I registered for a writing workshop through the Society of Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators – SCBWI-LI group in Bay Shore next Sunday. Now have to buckle down to make sure I have something to present. I have several other manuscripts that I’ve been working on, but I need to get them submission ready. I’m off from work a couple more days so that’s the plan.

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While reorganizing I came across an email that I had totally forgotten! Just after Thanksgiving, I learned that “David’s Flamingos” was nominated for a CYBIL Award in the picture book category. CYBIL – Children’s and Young Adult Literary Award. What a thing to lose track of.  I was blessed to have Jeanne Conway, as my illustrator. She did such a beautiful job with the artwork.  I’ve been blessed with this debut picture book.

Finalists were announced on January 1, 2019.  Check out the list.